Why are some colors off-limits?

The colors you see on this page are created when the red, green, and blue LEDs of your screen shine and mix together. If you print this webpage, ink in your printer will combine to make these colors, which you’ll see when you have a light source illuminating the page.

Some colors need light to shines through them, and having light reflects off them won’t produce the desired shade. This difference in how colors are created means that some shades just can’t be printed.

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The top row has colors you can create digitally, while the bottom shows you only those that can be printed.

A designer has to know which colors fall in the printable range, or he’ll design a logo that you’ll love on screen, but hate in print. Of course you’ll only learn this after spending money on your stationery, brochures, etc.

So what if it’s a different color?

Here are two examples showing what a logo could look like when presented on screen by an inxperienced designer, and what it would look like in reality.

For Ross Grass Masters the change isn’t so bad. The greens dull, but they still make sense for this lawn care company. A person seeing their logo on yard sign on their nighbor’s lawn will still become a loyal customer.

On the other hand we have Cobalt Solutions – a tech consulting company. Their carefully chosen bold color meant to communicate energy and inspire confidence looks dull and uninspiring in print.

The vibrant blue that gives the impression of a young, friendly, affordable company is outside the printable range. And, the color that can be printed gives the impression it’s a reserved, established company, with a more expensive service. The new color communicates the wrong thing to potential customers, costing Cobalt in lost business.

Avoid having your logo unexpectedly changing on you, by working with designers that understand the range of colors that are possible to create on the web and in print.

Among our clients: